Money! It Makes The World Go Round

Money is one of those things that makes most of us crazy! You either have lots of it or none of it. It's seems that we give this commodity a lot more power than we should, to the point that it actually controls our lives and base our beliefs and values systems on it. Sometimes, there comes a time when we really need to think of money for exactly what it is, a state of mind. Our attitude towards wealth and money seems more important than any other aspect in our lives. For some it is even more important than anything else in the world. Which, from my point of view seems very sad indeed.
Let's think about it. How we think and feel about money seems to determine how we live in society these days. If we have lots of money, and a high paying job, then it seems logical to think that we are better off and positive about our future and in turn, others in society are likely to be attracted or think highly of us. However, If we don't have a great deal of money, don't have a job, or have the security of a permanent job, then we are much more inclined to develop disorders such as Depression and such as well as the opinion of other in society looking down on us for not 'Keeping up with the Jones'.
To instigate change in our thoughts about money, either having or not, we really must start with changing our mindset and our predetermined opinions we have towards others around money and social prosperity. From change comes the power and determination to adjust and really see the real value in life.
Here are some things you may like to do for those situations where you feel uncomfortable when you spend money, or feel depressed about your financial state, or at any other time when you need to keep positive of your outcome in life.
Gratitude
Be Grateful for what you have. This may sound basic and like something your parents used to say to you when you were little, but, to be honest, it works. Take a notepad and write down all the good things that you have in your life. Don't concentrate on what is lacking and don't focus of material possessions or bank balances. Think of things like: Your Best Friend, the love of your dog, a roof over your head, the birds that fly around in the garden. the heat that makes your shower hot, the family members you have in your life and so on. Once you've done this, write a list of the things that someone from across the other side of the world might have to feel grateful for in life. Compare the two lists and really think about the differences in your answers compared to the answers in the other list. Chances are you will have a lot more to feel grateful for than you realise.
Self Esteem
Whenever you feel bad or negative about money, try to see it for it really is. Whenever you receive your paycheck or you get that payment deposited into your bank account from a client sale, why not pause for a moment and think to yourself "I've earned this money by working hard for it but I will not take it for granted. The money itself is only a reward for my personal efforts, it is not an acknowledgement of my status in the world." To become successful is not just about how much money you have, it can also be about your reputation in your line of work. For me, being successful in my business is more about how many satisfied clients I have, rather than, how much money I have in the bank. My reputation in the business world and how far I have come in my journey is much more important to me than having money to flash around.
Money Journal
Creating priorities is essential to find the money you need for your own self-care. To decide what your priorities grab a note pad and create a list with these categories:

Amount Spent (e.g. $8.50)

On What (e.g. Books, Lunch, Songs or Apps)

Feelings (e.g. Felt guilty afterwards, Felt good to read to magazine)

Once you have written down all the things you have spent for one month have a look at the patterns and try to figure out what to spend your money on in the future. For example, I don't enjoy buying my lunch but I love buying apps for my PDA, so I make my own lunch and save money every week to buy a $20 music voucher so I can buy more of the things I like. By paying attention on how you feel when you buy things you can rearrange your resources to better suit your real needs and feel good about the things you buy instead of feeling guilty or feeling bad.
Intuition
Next time you want to buy something you want, why not get in the habit of asking yourself:

Do I really need this?

Why am I buying this?

If I buy this will I still have enough money to pay for...?

Give yourself time to try to hear your inner voice of wisdom. Asking these questions will trigger your intuition and help you when you're feeling unsure if you should buy that latest item or not. If you think about it before you act, you can think about the effect it may have if you buy it or if you don't. It may leave you short for that power bill you need to pay next week or it might be okay to buy it this week but you may not be able to buy the following week.
When it comes to money, I agree it does make the world go around but I feel that there is way too much emphasis on how much of it we have and the importance that some of put on money as being seen as a successful person. If you have tips, stories or comments then I'd love to hear from you.

Rupert Murdoch – Chairman of News Corp, Owner of the Wall Street Journal

Melbourne, Victoria, Australia was the birthplace of Keith Rupert Murdoch. He was born into a wealthy family in 1931 and his father was a leading owner of many newspapers. Young Murdoch was sent to Oxford University while a young teen and he was only 22 years old when the elder Murdoch suddenly died under what was deemed suspicious circumstances.
As the heir to the newspaper family business Keith Rupert began to assume many executive duties and in 1953 he became the managing director of the News Limited. Soon his attentions would focus on the expansion of the Murdoch empire and he set about acquiring many of the competing news publications.
His first buyout was the Perth based Sunday Times. The brash young businessman utilized many of the tabloid fundamentals that he had learned from both Lord Northcliffe. Soon the struggling Sunday Times had become a major success. Expanding his reach, Rupert Murdoch began acquiring other newspaper businesses such as The Daily Mirror. It would not be long before Murdoch took control of The Dominion paper in New Zealand. This would be followed by additional takeovers that would eventually lead to Rupert Murdoch becoming the dominant stock shareholder for the New Zealand Independent Newspapers Limited media group. He would retain this prominent position until 2003.
Murdoch was directly responsible for the debut of Australia's 1st daily newspaper to achieve national prominence, The Australian. This paper would help boost Rupert Murdoch's personal stock and would earn him a reputation for heading a serious, quality newspaper. Additional businesses were added to the rapidly expanding Murdoch network but once he had made conquests in Australia, New Zealand and Britain his eye was on moving into the US newspaper world.
The first of Murdoch's many acquisitions in the US would occur in 1973. This was the year when Rupert Murdoch would seal a deal that gave him the San Antonio Express-News. Shortly after this buy was completed he created a tabloid that would become a fixture on news stands and supermarket checkout aisles, The Star. 3 years after making his first US newspaper buyout Rupert Murdoch would take over the New York Post.
Murdoch still wanted to add to his thriving media empire and in order to purchase a US television station he became a naturalized United States citizen in September of 1985. His Fox Network would be embroiled in controversy and scrutiny at the beginning but today this network is a major player in the market. In 1995 Rupert Murdoch cinched a deal with communications giant MCI that provided for the development of The Weekly Standard which was to be a combined project involving both a news website and a magazine.
His most recent acquisition was that of the 2007 purchase of the US based financial journal, the Wall Street Journal and the Dow Jones Company from the Bancroft family. The Bancrofts initially rebuffed the News Corp offers but after 3 months and a sweetened offer of $60 per share or just more than $5 billion.
Even though he has had to battle lawsuits, enormous debts and a shifting world economy Rupert Murdoch continues to be a leader in the world of media and communications. He recently celebrated his 79th birthday and his current personal net worth is estimated to be $4 billion dollars.